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[Mini review] Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day

Four days ago during my daily Twitter favourites wrap up, I stumbled across the term “flipped classroom”. As I read through descriptions of what a flipped classroom looked like and watched YouTube videos of fellow teachers advocating the benefits of a flipped classroom, I found myself hunting out more websites and more information on the topic. I eventually made my way to an Amazon kindle search and found the  book co-authored by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day.

Essentially the book is a brief description (intended to be read in

one hit) of Jonathan and
Aaron’s experiences while flipping their classroom. The book was an easy and interesting read, with several real life scenarios experienced by Jonathan and Aaron, as well other teachers who have made the jump to flipping their classroom.

The book is by no means a one stop shop to flipping your classroom, but what it does offer is a collection of adventures, highlighting the successes and frustrations Jonathan and Aaron went through during the flipping process.

Two models are explained throughout the book, the Flipped Model and the Flipped-Mastery Model. The latter combining flipped classrooms with the concept of Mastery Learning, popularised by Benjamin Bloom in the ’60s. Each model is explained in-depth, with reasons why you should introduce them, ideas about effective ways to go about introducing them to your colleagues and students, as well as a number of FAQ’s posed by educators like you and I.

As a physical educator, the nature of our subject means I rarely find myself “chalking and talking” (aside from some of the more difficult topics such as anatomy and physiology, biomechanics etc) in a lecture style format. However, the ideology behind a flipped classroom is something that has me excited, not only for the development of my own teaching pedagogy, but also for my current and future students who are bound to benefit from me implementing ideas I have taken away from this book. I am also interested to see what role my love for technology in our learning area plays during this process.

I hope to share some of my experiences here on this blog, as I begin working toward a flipped classroom throughout the second half of our teaching year here in NZ (as it is, I already have my first screencast via Camtasia Studio completed and ready to share!).

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